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(131): Nollywood Movie Review: VOICELESS

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  Nollywood Movie Review: VOICELESS   Director: Robert O. Peters Producer: Rogers Ofime Company: Native Media Writer: Jennifer Agunloye Year: November 18, 2020 Cast: Asabe Madaki, Yakubu Muhammad, Sani Muazu, Uzee Usman, Abba Zaki, Rakiya Atta, introducing Adam Garba, others.    Indisputable, only a few Kannywood productions attract the attention of the audience these days. Although the dialogue track and the actors in Voiceless are Hausa, the film does not belong to Kannywood. The movie, on the one hand, mounts a frigging assault, on the other hand, a serious challenge, to Kannywood. Though it’s unfair to match the glory of Nollywood and that of Kannywood, I can feel it in my bones that they must envy Nollywood for punching them and knocking their teeth out by producing the first wholly Hausa film that is now sold to Netflix. Here’s my review of the film.   Voiceless is an insurgency-inspired romantic-thriller motivated by the infamous abduction of Chibok schoolgir

(130): Izzar So: A Game-Changer Kannywood YouTube Series

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It is no longer news that the coronavirus pandemic has changed our lives and the world in general. The virus has already killed more than a million people and rendered tens of thousands others jobless. The tragic stories about the pandemic are numerous. There was a palpable fear for Africa, the most challenged continent on earth. Some analysts projected that there would be corpses littering African streets. However, the embattled continent, so far, fares much better than the rest, including Europe and North America. Likewise, some African filmmakers have not closed shop because of COVID-19. They, amazingly, do even better than ever. The makers of a Kannywood YouTube series, titled Izzar So , are some of these lucky lots.   Kannywood, the largely Hausa film industry, barely survives amidst a myriad of problems from within and outside. The biggest of them all is, perhaps, the collapse of the CD/DVD market in Kano and other northern Nigerian states. Recently, they started trying onlin

(129): Kannywood and its Unending Scandals (II)

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Muhsin Ibrahim muhsin2008@gmail.com   After breakfast on the morning of November 2, 2020, I turned on my phone’s Wi-Fi. I received several notifications from my email and social media accounts, particularly WhatsApp, Facebook and Twitter. Thanks to End SARS protest, I have been unusually active on Twitter recently. It’s more engaging and has become the battleground for socio-political, cultural and religious battle among Nigerians. However, the End SARS protest heightened this debate, especially between northerners and southerners who, arguably, differ on the issue. Unlike the previous days, today’s top trending topics are not about SARS at all. They are about a Kannywood star, Rahama Sadau. Although she’s not new to controversies, that of today is, I must say, provocative. It led to the creation of incendiary hashtags such as “Assistant Allah.”   Ms Sadau, this time, shared her photos on Instagram and Twitter the night before. She wears a tight, backless long sleeve, which s

(128): Gidan Badamasi: A Short Review of the Hausa Sitcom

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Gidan Badamasi : A Short Review of the Hausa Sitcom   Premiered in 2019, the defining criterion for the popular sitcom, Gidan Badamasi , is comedy. However, it tells much more such as several socio-moral lessons. That is not a surprise as Kannywood, the film industry whose members wrote, produced, directed and acted in Gidan Badamasi , are known for promoting such causes. An oft-repeated raison dêtre of Kannywood, some of its members argue, is to teach morality, promote Hausa culture and Islam, among other related goals. Whether or not they do that is debatable and, of course, outside the scope of this short review. The title, Gidan Badamasi [ Badamasi’s House ], implies where the drama takes place – the house of Alhaji Badamasi. He is a wealthy, wheelchair-bound businessman who had multiple marriages from which he got several children. As he ages, becomes more frail and sickly, he asks most of them – he doesn’t know all of them – to come for a crucial meeting. After their arriva

(127): Review of Isma’il Bala’s Line of Sight | by Abubakar Isah Baba

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Title : Line of Sight, Author : Ismail Bala, Pages : 114, Publisher : Praxis Magazine, Reviewer : Abubakar Isah Baba Introduction As a genre of literature, poetry is the most intensely focused one. Often, writers choose it as their transmitter of inward messages. Line of Sight in its first appearance establishes that poetry is a carrier of experiences and a painter of life. Ismail Bala’s personal experiences are apparent in his collection of eighty-one poems. His blending of layered themes: arts, love, politics, friendship, mundanity and Eurocentrism will continue to define poetry as both elusive and straightforward. And this is what gives the collection a startling flavour. It is not the intention of this piece to review every poem but rather to discuss some. The book’s title displays the most famous painting of George Seurat called Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte . It depicts the poet’s high level of exposure to the western arts, as the title Line of Sight sh

(126): Re: New Horizon: Dadin Kowa and the Restorative Representation of the "Other" in Nigerian Films

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By Abubakar Isah Baba The article  named above was written by Muhsin Ibrahim, and published in the 2019/2020 edition of KAKAKI: Journal of English and Literary Studies ; (11) 81 - 98.   The first time I watched the drama Dadin Kowa I felt at ease, for it is highly natural, exciting and yet unusual. The soap opera displays the quintessence of Hausa cultural mores; the fictional town of Dadin Kowa reveales the typical, densely populated urban area, mainly crowded with dirty, run-down housing, poverty and social disarray of the Hausa people. There you watch actors as if in reality, mingle with the stray of goats, sheep and chickens. All these are what make the soap opera attractive for it brings the truth before our eyes. Dadin Kowa is enriched with compelling and relevant topics that are within the present condition of its setting, such as insurgency, drug abuse, domestic violence, Almajirci , girl-child education, to name but a few. This is, perhaps, what diver

(125): Rape: Blaming the Victim as the Perpetrator

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By Amina Haruna and Muhsin Ibrahim Sexual violence and rape occur worldwide. Some rape incidents defy any logic, while others may be associated with sadism, paedophilia, other types of paraphilia (i.e. sexual disorders). Consequently, throughout history, people weaponize sex. Women, including underage, are mostly the victims. Soldiers raped numerous women during and in the aftermath of World War II. Years later, more soldiers and militias raped women in the Yugoslav Wars of the early 1990s. Most recently, in 2015, French peacekeepers were charged for sexually abusing children in the Central African Republic in exchange for food and money. The stories are similar during several civil wars in other parts of Africa and beyond. Rape happens in peacetime, too. Now and again, news of rape springs up in countries, particularly India. In a widely watched documentary, in 2013, the BBC World Services described India as the most dangerous place to be a woman. While there are rape cases in Nig