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(85): Islam, Culture, Social Media and the Rest of Us

Muhsin Ibrahim muhsin2008@gmail.com
Facebook, or any other social media, is no longer what it used to be: a mere, innocuous social networking site for friending, chatting, sharing pictures and the like. It is, today, a life shaping platform. This and a whole host of other reasons, therefore, call for parents, guardians and all to be (more) wary of how, and of course who, his/her children, wards, younger siblings, etc interact with. I will give three (3) examples.
First, the Internet, in general, is a harbour for amassed pornographic contents. Recently, the Indian government banned viewing of porn contents in their country. But due to pressure and protests, they had to lift the ban. These days, there are many pages for that on Facebook, chat groups on WhatsApp, etc. The kids can be smart but not really smarter. Devise your ways to curtail this via best possible means.
While the first danger could easily be detected, the second one is eerily, barely detectable. This is the rise of perverted…
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(84): Emir Sanusi’s Diatribe and Question of Superior Opinion

Muhsin Ibrahim muhsin2008@gmail.com
A famous line from Shakespeare’s celebrated Romeo and Juliet poses a question, thus: “What is in a name?” While Juliet believes that there’s nothing significant in a name, for Romeo will remain her heartthrob irrespective of his family’s name, affiliation matters in many other places such as Nigeria. The play, if adapted and set here, would (should) be different. There is so much meaning attached to names in the Nigerian socio-political context and discourse. Perhaps, that is why the former governor of the Nigerian apex bank, Sanusi Lamido Sanusi (SLS) quickly changed his name to Muhammadu Sanusi II when he ascended to power as the emir of Kano in 2014.
Other possible reasons could be his effort to start life afresh, free of politics, and to maintain the tradition, and to revive the genealogy of his grandfather who was also an emir. The then SLS was well-known to be a very vocal, daring and assertive, public intellectual. Lo, the same old SLS keeps on …

(83): Yes Man (A Short Story)

Muhsin Ibrahim @muhsin234
Religion is one single thing many Nigerians of whatever dispensations take in high esteem. Religion is, many a time, viewed as the opium for the subjugation of masses or as their Achilles’ heel. To Rahama, the story is different; religion means nothing to her. It is simply an identifier that she’s a Muslim lady. One might think having grown up in a multi-religious house would intuitively teach her to have respect of some sort for religion, wrong. Her Imams and pastors do not use Qur’an or Bible.
A 28-year-old, stout Rahama Tsoho belongs to a disreputable family of three. Her father, an ex-service man, divorced their mother when she’s only two. She stays with the father, her sister with the mother. She had longed to marry since her teenage, but she couldn’t. She always attributes this to her look and family. So, she vows to live a better life in the future by hook or crook and begins to use highly effective and expensive bleaching creams to brighten her skin. She…

(82): The Dilemma of a Plucky Philosopher-Wannabe

Muhsin Ibrahim Twitter: @muhsin234
The world has never been short of the irresolvable arguments of and on philosophy. While the beast is cherished by many, many more others hate it like they abhor their death. The recent raging row on Facebook among the northern youth about the relevance or otherwise of studying Philosophy is nothing that new, unexpected or shocking, at least to me. What is astonishing is the way the whole drama is perceived by some, and treated by others, while many are left totally baffled. This is, perhaps, one of the reasons why some ‘concerned’ individuals sought my opinion on the matter. This is what I set out to do here.
For a record, I am not a philosopher and I won’t pretend to be one. I don’t even find Philosophy a discipline worthy of my drunken desire to learning. I had once started an online course on it on Coursera, for which I downloaded and purchased some books, but I abandoned it halfway. However, I have read a few of those books. As a former student of …

(81): Kannywood Movie Review: There’s a Way

Production:    Jammaje Productions
Producer:       Abba El-Mustapha Director:         Falalu A. Dorayi Year:              2016 Cast:              Nuhu  Abdullahi, Hajara Jalingo, Abba El-Mustapha, Zainab Booth,Sani Mu’azu, Umar Malumfashi and others
God bless the dichotomy between the rich and the poor, or as the socialists call it: the gap between the lower, the bourgeoisies and the upper classes. If it did not exist, the arts would, perhaps, have to invent one for stories to have conflict, upon which many films, novels, dramas, etc rely to intrigue us. This has been the trend since the Victorian Age, or before, with Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, Charles Dickens’ Oliver Twist down to Femi Osofisan’s Marxist-influenced plays, and so on and so forth. Class consciousness is sadly here to stay with us.
Hausa film industry is equally not short of films based on this global theme. There’s a Way is just another addition to that archive, though in a new style: its language is no longer the ‘l…

(80): Kannywood Movie Review: HIJIRA

Director:         Iliyasu Abdulmumini Tantiri Producer:       Naziru Dan Hajiya Story:              Iliyasu Abdulmumini Tantiri Language:      Hausa Year:               2016 Company:      Kumo Production
Introduction
The Hijra (migration/exodus) of the Prophet Muhammad (SAW) and his companions from Makkah to Madinah is an epoch in the history of Islam. It is featured notably in the Qur’an and the Sunnah of the Prophet. Although the Prophet was born and raised in Makkah and had preached for many years there, persecution forced him along with the few that believed him to migrate. The Islamic Hijri calendar began from that time. The choice of the title for the film cannot be unconnected to the Prophet’s Hijra.
Oftentimes, the bond between cinema and the orthodox religious and cultural institutions is marked by disquiet. Many people reject film, seeing it as a subtle way to debase their religion and culture. Presentations of bedroom scene, or virtually anything denoting sex or other tabooed su…

(79): The Reign of Bigotry, Disunity and Provincialism in Nigeria

Muhsin Ibrahim @muhsin234
This is a compilation of the 2 posts I made on Facebook on December 3rd, 2016 on two related and burning national issues. Enjoy:
On the Deaths of Corps Members
There was a furore in the news Friday (02/12/2016) that a female corps member, Ifedolapo Oladepo, died in the Kano orientation camp. No doubt, her death is unfortunate and very heartbreaking especially for her loved ones, but how the story was/is told left me dumbfounded and shocked. The whole saga was territorialised, regionalised, and localised as if the National Youth Service Corps (NYSC) scheme was a state business. Thus, Kano is blamed. It’s, after all, Nigeria, and the North is almost always portrayed in bad light. To some southerners, nothing comes out of this ‘Almajiri-populated’ enclave.

My suspicion was corroborated with the reaction ‘generated’ by yet another death of another female corps member identified as Miss Elechi Chiyerum. This occurred not in the North but at the Bayelsa orientation camp…