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(72): The Rise of Rape Cases in Kano

By
Muhsin Ibrahim
@muhsin234

The recent infamous sodomy case of Hassan Ibrahim Gwarzo Secondary School, Kano did not happen in a vacuum. Numerous similar other cases occurred and continue to but they are unfortunately seldom reported, for they did not affect the children of the affluents. For instance, about a week or so ago, I heard on Rahama Radio program that a young man had sexually defiled about 5 boys in their neighborhoods. While interviewed by Fagge Hisbah Command, the amateur homo said that nobody had ever taught, or had a similar contact with him. He, I learned, wanted to say that that was something inborn to him. This is a lie. Homosexuality is nothing innate; sex attraction is physiologically between opposite sexes.

Another horrendous, even more horrible, happening is the spate of rape cases of underage girls in the state. A doctor at Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital disclosed that in the hospital alone they, on almost daily basis, get more than ten rape cases of either boys or girls. I didn't believe her story until when I heard that a boy in our neighbourhoods was sexually assaulted last night. And then the stories of similar cases emerged from here and there. I say: Innaa lillahi wa innaa ilaihi raaji'uun! What is our community turning into?

I have chronicled the following on my Facebook page. I think I should repost it on my blog for more publicity and awareness.


As reported on the Freedom Radio “Inda Ranka” program on 7th February 2016, a man raped his friend's daughter after fetching her from their primary school. On another instance, a 65-year-old pedophile raped a 12-year-old girl. Again, a few days later, this time at Gwammaja quarters, a girl, 6, was raped, decapitated and dumped on the street. I was devastated, wallahi. 

I grappled with the sinister story for the rest of the night till the almighty sleep surreptitiously snapped me. As I woke up today, the same begins to hunt me. I am out of words to say. It's so sickening such things are happening in our midst.

A far more sickening shocker happened this week. A girl, 16, was waylaid by a gang of four rapists while seeing her friend's boyfriend off at Kawo Maigari, Hotoro quarters. The latter and a friend later joined the assailants who are actually his friends and raped the innocent girl repeatedly. She's now at the hospital battling for her life.

According to the reports, all the savage rapists are children born with silver spoons. Thus, their parents have been restless, doing everything to secure their kids' release. However the Kano police command paraded them, and vows to see that justice prevails.

It's heartrending that girls are becoming more vulnerable in our societies today. It's more heartbreaking that people don't seem to care much. We rather labour ourselves in criticising or defending politicians whom care little or not at all about us.

Due to our nonchalant attitudes, several other similar cases occurred and ended under-reported or unreported at all. Again, the rapists are oftentimes acquitted - and some are never even tried - in spite of whatever evidence brought against them.

I wouldn't get tired of telling parents to be more vigilant and more prayerful. It’s not all doomed. We really need to wake up. Parents and guardians ought to be very wary with regards to the movements of their daughters and wards. Do not trust any non-Maharam near them, though it is no longer girls whose movements and activities should be monitored. The same, or more, measures should be applied on the male children, for they are now equally vulnerable. Know their friends and other people they deal or chat with on the Internet and offline. Do everything, but don't be over protective, for only Allah can truly secure the chaste of our girls today.

India took a number of measures, including legislative ones to curtail dramatic rise in rape in the country. Nigeria should do the same to amend the constitution to apply a capital punishment to anybody found guilty of rape, or a very long sentence with hard labour for these animals. They deserve no mercy whatsoever, for they do not have an ounce of it. I hope Muslim Women Lawyers Association and similar concerned groups and associations will always follow any rape cases in and outside Kano.

Allah ya iya mana kawai, amin.

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